Conference Schedule

Download the Conference Program .

The conference opens Thursday evening at 6:30 pm.  However, please join us early as we offer multiple pre-conference workshops* Thursday morning and afternoon.

* Please note: These workshops will be provided at an additional fee.

Register Now

Following is a tentative schedule for the pre-conference workshops and conference opening on Thursday, as well as for all Friday sessions:

Thursday

9:00 am -6:00 pm: Registration 

9:00 - 11:30 am : Pre-Conference Workshops
          *
Teaching with Panache
          *Course Design:  A Look into the Future
1:00 - 3:00 pm : Pre-Conference Workshops
          *
Engaging in the Scholarly Pursuit of Research and Publication
          *Cultural Intelligence (CQ) in the Classroom 

Conference Opens

6:30 - 7:30 pm : Invited Talk
7:30 - 9:00 pm : Reception

Friday 

7:30:  Registration Opens

8:00 - 8:30 am : Concurrent Sessions

Organizational Culture, Leadership, and Change (Clark)
Richard Van Doel, Jill Forte, and Judson Curry (Indiana Wesleyan University)

Identifying and understanding organizational culture is a key consideration to leadership and organizational effectiveness. Panelists will discuss the change methods employed to achieve the culture change from the current to the preferred culture state. Understanding the nature of the relationship (congruent or non-congruent) between organizational culture and the organizations' leaders may identify an unknown competitive advantage for the organization or provide an opportunity to develop a new competitive advantage.

Exploring Graduate Level Faculty Development Options: Faculty Members Perceptions of Needs (Dawson)
Jim Freemyer, Tajuana Washington, Lisa Simms, Jeremy Williams, and Michael Mallet (Indiana Wesleyan University)

The recent growth in the number of adults pursuing higher education and graduate degrees has prompted a fresh look at faculty development needs for the thousands of adjuncts who provide online and onsite courses to this population. The focus of the research is to seek input directly from the adjunct faculty regarding their perceived development needs. How do online faculty members better engage adults in the learning process? Strategies for improved adult student engagement will be assessed in regard to online and onsite learning environments.

Faculty Development in the Age of Online "Everything" (Brady)
Anastasia Trekles (Purdue University Calumet), Erin White (Purdue University North Central), and Pamela Riesmeyer
(Purdue University Calumet)

Truly, almost everything is online nowadays - course materials, grading, registration, financial aid, the list goes on. Nearly all facets of the university are being moved, at least in some form, to the online realm, but how can this evolution be made more straightforward for faculty and students? This presentation focuses on the faculty development programs and research conducted at two regional public universities in northwest Indiana, including successes, challenges, and lessons learned during the creation and implementation of these programs.

Bearing Witness in the Literature and Composition Classroom Leads to Student Empowerment (Hart)
Dottie Hutcherson (Indiana Wesleyan University)

Linguistic theory posits that the act of testifying is empowering for the speaker. My research analyzing contemporary American fiction demonstrates that literary characters overcome oppression and survive because of their ability to testify. This empowerment extends to the classroom as well. This research has pedagogical implications that extend beyond the literature or composition classroom, as students across the curriculum can be encouraged to reflect on past resilience and become increasingly confident in their chosen disciplines.

In Transition: Adult Program Governance Trends in Christian Institutions (Shields)
Stephen Holtrop (Huntington University)

This presentation summarizes case studies recently published in the Jossey-Bass series New Directions in Higher Education. The researchers found varying models for how Christian universities have addressed the administrative and service functions needed by their adult programs. As adult programs grow, their relationship with the traditional programs change, and outside forces also work to realign the balance of centralization vs. autonomy.


Improving Student Engagement in an Online Learning Environment (Allison)
William Adams (Campbellsville University), Chuck Crain (Campbellsville University) and Kevin Hughes
(Mount Vernon Nazarene University)

The online learning environment can be a very isolating and lonely place for many students. Online instructors play a critical role in not only facilitating course discussion, but also ensuring that the students are engaged in the course. This session will include personal best practices for improving student engagement in an online course, as well as reliable and valid ideas rooted in current literature that attendees can take and immediately apply to improve their respective pedagogical techniques.

Environmental Scanning: Critical to Business (Myers)
Marcus Myers (Indiana Wesleyan University)

Environmental scanning is a critical element of designing, creating, and operating a successful business endeavor and is a valuable tool in many other decision making situations. This literature review examines the research related to the theory and process of environmental scanning as well as the usage of the resulting information.

8:45 - 9:15 am : Concurrent Sessions

Adapting Adult Learner Programs: Implementing Blended Learning (Clark)
Cindy Carter (Fresno Pacific University)

How can adult learner programs adapt to Carnegie Hour requirements while enriching students' skills? A time-sensitive (two semester) model for institutional transformation is described, including step-by-step guidelines for the implementation of Blended Learning systems. Participants leave with a detailed plan outlining the development and implementation of comprehensive Blended course delivery.

All the World's a Stage: Improvisation, Simulation, and Game-playing as Critical Teaching and Learning Tools  (Dawson)
Jon Ross (Union Institute & University)

Improvisation - an extemporaneous response to and creative variations on established themes - is not only fun, it's a skill we can all use. As an art, improvisation takes on a deeper meaning. By incorporating improvisation games teachers harness students' creativity, often providing new perspectives on serious issues. This paper will provide perspective on role-playing/improvisation and their applications to the classroom - in live and online settings. Consistent with improvisation's cardinal rule of "show, don't tell," he may facilitate an improvisation/role-play (or two) - for those attendees daring enough to enjoy the process.

Teaching as Acting (Brady)
Tracy Manning (Taylor University)

Teaching at its best can be transformational. For knowledge to be transformational the facts need some urgency and reality that gives students a reason to care. Moreover, most teachers want to pass on their passion as well as their knowledge to their students. This often involves theatricality: teaching then incorporates some of the methods employed in the art of acting. In this session we will be exploring the commonalities between teaching and acting and exercise our abilities to incorporate what we learn into our experience. No previous acting experience required.

vLeader: A Simulation for Leadership Preparation Programs (Hart)
John Somers and Lynn Wheeler (University of Indianapolis)

A challenge for educational leadership programs is to bring the reality of leading and managing schools into the university classroom. The field is in need of a training platform that blends the reality of leadership challenges with guided support and practice. An Alternate Reality Game (ARG) appears to be a good choice for providing an immersive experience for principal candidates. Qualitative analysis indicates positive benefit to two cohorts of aspiring principals.

Improving Pre-Service Teachers' Questioning Patterns: An Example from Language Education (Shields)
Muchun Yin (Indiana Wesleyan University)

Teacher questioning-the ways in which a teacher asks questions and responds to student answers in the classroom-plays a vital role in constructing and extending student knowledge, and can also be seen as a kind of assessment for learning. Research on attempts to improve teachers' questioning patterns has shown that training can be effective; however, that literature is small and more research is needed. This paper reports on the implementation and results of a pedagogical task designed to improve pre-service language teachers' questioning. Further benefits, issues, limitations, and recommendations related to the pedagogical task are also discussed in the paper.

Business Planning in an "Out of the Blue" Environment (Allison)
Gary Wilkinson (Indiana Wesleyan University)

Over the past decade, businesses have encountered a number of events which seem to have come "out of the blue." Some of these, such as the financial and housing crisis, were due to inadequacies in our political and/or financial systems. Others, such a the tsunami in Japan (which severely disrupted supply chains for many industries,) or the effects of hurricane Sandy were events which could not be forecasted. In all cases, businesses have had to cope with both risks (variation which can be reasonably estimated,) but also uncertainty (influences which cannot be forecasted.) This paper will discuss some current advances in business planning which go beyond traditional forecasting and risk analysis. The focus will be on techniques for simulation and stress testing of business systems to order to build greater flexibility in the planning process.

Servant Leadership: A Literature Review (Sawmill)
Kim Parcher (Indiana Institute of Technology)

Servant Leadership (SL) remains a topic of great interest well over thirty years after Greenleaf (1977) introduced the term. A need exists, therefore, to collate all empirical studies on SL up to the present in order to reflect on SL theory progress and broadly outline the nature of current studies as well as suggest directions for future SL research, especially outside of a North American context. Religious studies specifically will be reviewed as this branch of SL appears undeveloped in the literature.

How Local Church Volunteers Experience Satisfaction in Their Local Church (Wabash)
Paul Garverick (Indiana Wesleyan University)

Local church volunteer satisfaction received scant study in comparison to job satisfaction in the for-profit sector and volunteer satisfaction in the volunteer sector. This qualitative case study will utilize semi-structured group interviews to explore, in the contexts of a local church and its organizational leadership, how local church volunteers experience satisfaction in their local church.

9:30 - 10:00 am : Concurrent Sessions

Examining the Role of Educational foundations in our Current Political Culture (Hart)
David Roof, Ball State University

This paper focuses on the impact of an educational foundations course on teacher efficacy and agency. Specifically, it's based on research surveys examining the effectiveness of course content and classroom structure on perceived levels of teacher efficacy in relation to the current political climate facing teachers. My contention is that efficacy and agency are central to long- term job satisfaction, and that while aspiring teachers have extensive exposure to coursework on teaching students, their access to knowledge and contemplation on the issues facing teachers is limited.

Implementation of Active Learning Strategies in Online Courses in the Health Sciences (Shields)
Annette Tommerdahl and Paula Griswold (University of Louisiana-Monroe)

Several active learning strategies were utilized to improve student engagement in online courses in the Health Sciences. Case studies and video clips were used to prompt discussion within the context of the assignments. Utilizing active learning strategies has enriched our courses and provided a more robust and thought-provoking learning experience for our students in the health sciences.

Acculturation, Social Support, and Self-Esteem as Predictors of Mental Health Among Foreign Students: A Study of Nigerian Nursing Students (Allison)
Verna LaFleur (Indiana Wesleyan University)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between acculturation, social support, and self-esteem on mental health among Nigerian nursing students. This study sought an explanation for the challenges that Nigerian students experience while completing their nursing education in the US. Understanding the factors that impact academic performance in nursing school will help educators to design interventions that will decrease the health problems and increase the possibility of success for this subgroup.

The Relationship Between Leader Humility, Trustworthiness, and Integrity: A Study of Teachers' Perceptions of Principals (Sawmill)
Brenda Oyer (Bowling Green State University)

This study emphasizes multicultural education, school leadership and teaching. Teachers play a critical role in the education of non-mainstream students. Oftentimes, teachers face challenges with classroom behaviors and student learning when pedagogy does not relate to students' cultural lives. The school context (policies, culture, history, etc.) affects how teachers interact with cultural competence.A key implication to cultural competence in the school context deals with the need to build more awareness and sensitivity to cultural competence in school leadership and contextual support.We will present results of two studies in conjunction with the literature and include school leader and teacher voices on the topic of cultural competence in the school context.

Change Effectiveness in Elementary Schools (Wabash)
Richard Van Doel, Chyrisse King, and Jill Forte (Indiana Wesleyan University

Implementation of meaningful long-term organizational change is difficult. However, a primary function of leadership is to implement change. This study examined the relationship between Principal involvement and follower engagement in the successful implementation of change within two elementary schools. The results are discussed with regard to their implications for future research and the improvement of practice. Understanding how the relationship between Principal involvement and follower engagement impacts change implementation should be of interest to school districts, Principals, and school assessment practices.

10:00:  Registration Closes

10:15-11:30 : Keynote Address "Reaping the Benefits of SoTL: Conducting and Applying Pedagogical Research"

11:45 - 12:15 pm : Concurrent Sessions

Analytic Opportunities in Online Education (Clark)
Roland Schwarm (Pearson Learning)

A conversation on analytic approach and opportunities in a context of both the online course and beyond.In the current landscape of technology and education, there is growing interest in the capabilities of analytics. A prevalent approach seems to be where potential capability is addressed by a combination of traditional BI type process and\or assigning broad meaning to data patterns in ways that may not be easily validated . In this session we will be speaking to one way of effectively aligning the
methods of information handling with creating a measurable impact to the online education experience.

Better Grading Faster: Technologies to Improve Student Feedback and Save Instructor Time (Shields)
David Kotter (Indiana Wesleyan University)

Educators agree students are most likely to thrive when they receive timely and detailed feedback on their assignments. Yet extensive remarks and annotations can strain the limits of an instructor's scarce time especially in light of large classes, a multiplicity of assignments, and the challenge of scrawling paragraphs into narrow margins. Several emerging (and increasingly inexpensive) technologies bring hope that the inherent conflict between serving students and saving time can be overcome. The goal is to provide new techniques that will significantly improve student feedback while reducing the seemingly endless hours devoted to grading.

Constructing An Assessment For The Imbalance Theory of Foolishness (Allison)
Melvin Woodard III (Indiana Wesleyan University)

This research study sought to construct a valid and reliable assessment for the imbalance theory of foolishness. The theory was first introduced in a chapter entitled "Smart People Are Not Stupid, But They Sure Can Be Foolish." The theory builds upon the balance theory of wisdom by viewing foolishness as the trait opposite of wisdom. Sternberg (2002) believed that people in positions of great power often acquire dispositions that dispose them to foolishness (Sternberg, 2004). Power was assumed to predispose the individual to foolishness in this research. Scale development was initiated from 150 questions generated from articles written by Sternberg and Jordan. The 56 items were reduced through principal axis factoring with oblique rotation.

Corporate Social Responsibility and Deming's Continuous Improvement (Sawmill)
Marcus Myers (Indiana Wesleyan University)

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is self-regulation integrated into an organization's strategy and business model. CSR calls for companies to strike a balance between economic responsibility to shareholders, legal responsibility to comply with laws, ethical responsibility to abide by societal norms, and philanthropic responsibility to meet the needs of society.
Organizations that aspire to meet strategic future challenges must have cultures and systems that drive improvement in all parts of the business. Deming's fourteen points provides a roadmap for CSR that promotes leadership that engages the entire workforce in organizational transformation towards excellence.

Research Project Report: A Study of Followership (Wabash)
Lonnie Clinkscale (Indiana Wesleyan University)

This study provides a compelling argument that followership has significant meaning in enhancing organizational value and encourages the discussion of how followers are as important to the organization as leader are. 154 service employees at the Aramark ® Corporation were surveyed using the Personal Style Questionnaire by Robert Kelley (1992). The results demonstrated differences in how two departments of service employees rated on critical thinking and active engagement.

12:30 - 1:30 pm : Lunch

1:45 - 2:15 pm : Concurrent Sessions

Understanding What Undergraduates Know About Social Media: Transitioning from Casual to Business Usage  (Hart)
Susan Baim (Miami University)

Contemporary business students are prolific users of social media. Among friends, casual communications through social media venues are eclipsing traditional communication channels. Concurrently, businesses view social media as the newest communications frontier and, in many cases, an ideal way to connect with customers. As business students transition into the workforce, they will find it necessary to apply their social media skills in ways that they may never have envisioned. This paper describes research to understand business students' knowledge of social media and self-perceptions of their readiness to effectively use such technologies at work.

Preparing students for STEM careers and the early college high school reform model (Shields)
Julie Haun-Frank (Ball State University)\

Early college high schools (ECHSs) represent a national reform model that has been adopted by public school districts across the US. The ECHS model is recognized as an avenue to improve STEM education outcomes by closing gaps in achievement and STEM career attainment. We know little about the kinds of STEM career pathways ECHSs provide for marginalized groups. This study fills this gap by examining the nature of the STEM learning trajectory one ECHS, focused on Health Science, made available to youth. Employing network theory and ethnographic methodology,

Memory Strategies Used By Teachers (Allison)
Sau Hou Chang (Indiana University Southeast)

There is a lot of information students need to remember at school. The current study examined the strategies teachers used to help students to memorize the information. Research questions were: (1) What type of information students need to remember? (2) What strategies do teachers use to help students to remember the information? Results showed that the information students need to remember were mostly facts and basic knowledge, and strategies teachers used to help students to remember were repetition, visual images, practice, elaboration, and mnemonics

Teaching Research Concepts through Challenging Student Assumptions (Sawmill)
Lisa Hoffman (Indiana University Southeast)

Understanding foundational elements of research-such as validity, reliability, generalizability, and researcher bias-requires well-developed critical thinking skills and the ability to evaluate textual arguments (Suter, 2012; Davis, 2007). This study investigated whether case-study-based activities designed to develop critical thinking skills would also increase student mastery of foundational concepts in an introductory research course. Assessments indicated that the participatory activities which required students to evaluate textual arguments and most challenged student assumptions had the most effect on student understanding and application of fundamental research concepts in a graduate education program.

Sturdy Enough: Stepping Beyond Some of Servant Leadership's Critiques (Wabash)
Robert Fischer (Texas State University) and Christopher McNiven (Aspire Consulting, LLC)

The purpose of this presentation is to develop an understanding of servant leadership (SL) that is not subject to these two criticisms by articulating the basic philosophical foundations of servant leadership, arguing that they are sturdy enough for the theory's purposes, and showing how these value-laden notions can be operationalized for researchers, using tools from management studies (in particular, organizational development) and environmental psychology.

2:30 - 3:00 pm : Concurrent Sessions

Understanding What Undergraduates Know About Social Media: Transitioning from Casual to Business Usage (Hart)
Susan Baim (Miami University)

Contemporary business students are prolific users of social media. Among friends, casual communications through social media venues are eclipsing traditional communication channels. Concurrently, businesses view social media as the newest communications frontier and, in many cases, an ideal way to connect with customers. As business students transition into the workforce, they will find it necessary to apply their social media skills in ways that they may never have envisioned. This paper describes research to understand business students' knowledge of social media and self-perceptions of their readiness to effectively use such technologies at work.

Preparing students for STEM careers and the early college high school reform model (Shields)
Julie Haun-Frank (Ball State University)

Early college high schools (ECHSs) represent a national reform model that has been adopted by public school districts across the US. The ECHS model is recognized as an avenue to improve STEM education outcomes by closing gaps in achievement and STEM career attainment. We know little about the kinds of STEM career pathways ECHSs provide for marginalized groups. This study fills this gap by examining the nature of the STEM learning trajectory one ECHS, focused on Health Science, made available to youth. Employing network theory and ethnographic methodology,

Memory Strategies Used By Teachers (Allison)
Sau Hou Chang (Indiana University Southeast)

There is a lot of information students need to remember at school. The current study examined the strategies teachers used to help students to memorize the information. Research questions were: (1) What type of information students need to remember? (2) What strategies do teachers use to help students to remember the information? Results showed that the information students need to remember were mostly facts and basic knowledge, and strategies teachers used to help students to remember were repetition, visual images, practice, elaboration, and mnemonics

Teaching Research Concepts through Challenging Student Assumptions (Sawmill)
Lisa Hoffman (Indiana University Southeast)

Understanding foundational elements of research-such as validity, reliability, generalizability, and researcher bias-requires well-developed critical thinking skills and the ability to evaluate textual arguments (Suter, 2012; Davis, 2007). This study investigated whether case-study-based activities designed to develop critical thinking skills would also increase student mastery of foundational concepts in an introductory research course. Assessments indicated that the participatory activities which required students to evaluate textual arguments and most challenged student assumptions had the most effect on student understanding and application of fundamental research concepts in a graduate education program.

Sturdy Enough: Stepping Beyond Some of Servant Leadership's Critiques (Wabash)
Robert Fischer (Texas State University) and Christopher McNiven (Aspire Consulting, LLC)

The purpose of this presentation is to develop an understanding of servant leadership (SL) that is not subject to these two criticisms by articulating the basic philosophical foundations of servant leadership, arguing that they are sturdy enough for the theory's purposes, and showing how these value-laden notions can be operationalized for researchers, using tools from management studies (in particular, organizational development) and environmental psychology.

3:15 - 3:45 pm : Concurrent Sessions

Examining the Relationship that Spiritual Well-Being and Gender Have with the Leadership Practices of College Student (Clark)
Ricky Christman (Ohio Christian University)

This research project contributed to the ongoing research surrounding the leadership practices of college student leaders and the variables that contribute to these practices. A positive correlation between each of the five components of the Student Leadership Practices Inventory and the composite score of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale was discovered. This discovery provides evidence that spiritual well-being influences the leadership practices of college student leaders.

Corporate Social Responsibility and Deming's Continuous Improvement (Dawson)
Ryan Nolte (Indiana Wesleyan University)

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is self-regulation integrated into an organization's strategy and business model. CSR
calls for companies to strike a balance between economic responsibility to shareholders, legal responsibility to comply with laws, ethical responsibility to abide by societal norms, and philanthropic responsibility to meet the needs of society. This effort is directed at continually improving an organization's performance on social, environment, and economic metrics. Organizations that aspire to meet strategic future challenges must have cultures and systems that drive improvement in all parts of the business. Deming's fourteen points provides a roadmap for CSR that promotes leadership that engages the entire workforce in
organizational transformation towards excellence.

Learning Styles and Cultural Intelligence in Global Leadership Development (Brady)
Heather St Peters (Indiana Institute of Technology)

In a global environment, an individual must adapt or learn; however, some individuals seem to reap benefits from overseas assignment, while others do not (Armstrong & Mahmud, 2008). Yamazaki and Kayes (2004) proposed that the ideal global
leader would prefer concrete experience. This study examined the impact of learning styles on the change in cultural intelligence (CQ), a malleable construct related to positive organizational outcomes and attitudes. This study indicates concrete experiences in cross-cultural training may improve CQ.

Assessing Business Programs through the Business Capstone Course (Shields)
Rick Corum, Pat Cowherd, Ann Moore (Campbellsville Univerisity)

College and university business schools utilize a Capstone Course to measure the outcomes of their program, and the student's attainment of program goals. This research examines the use of the Business Capstone course as an effective assessment tool for undergraduate business degree programs. This presentation will help business educators and institutions to develop or re- tool their existing Capstone Courses,to meet the new, rigorous assessment objectives with regional accrediting agencies,and accreditation. Through proper assessment of business programs colleges can ensure that their students are getting the best education possible.

Greed or Self-Interest: A Biblical Evaluation of Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations (Allison)
David Kotter (Indiana Wesleyan University)

Adam Smith published Wealth of Nations in 1776 and is called the father of modern economics. This weighty book is still in print more than two centuries later and ranks near best-seller status on Amazon. This presentation will analyze the work of Adam Smith from a biblical perspective to demonstrate ways in which his theories are consistent with or deviate from the Bible. The goal is to challenge business instructors (and everyone who participates in commercial activity) to discern between biblical truths and fundamental errors underlying modern economics.

Of Discipleship and Discipline: A Conversation on Student Formation at Christian Universities (Sawmill)
Anne Tohme (Trinity International University) and Christopher McNiven (Aspire Consulting, LLC)

Over the past ten years, market factors and institutional choices have added a layer of complexity to the mission of student formation upon which so many schools were established. Using a case study of Resident Life at one Christian University this session looks to explore an evolving framework for conceiving of student formation that has migrated to fit the changing spiritual demands of traditional undergraduate students in a residential program. It offers a theological perspective that meets a current generation of students aspiring to leadership without an understanding of submission and a belief that they are their own authority

Quantitative Comparison of Traditional to Combined Online Instruction for Simple Linear Regression (Wabash)
Joseph Snider (Indiana Wesleyan University)

Businesses require statistically literate workers. The purpose of this exploratory study was to research a possible method of improving statistical literacy under the recommendations of the 2005 GAISE college report by comparing a combined approach of four online instructional methods to traditional methods of lecture and textbook for the topic of simple linear regression. The participants in the study were from MBA cohorts at a private Midwestern university. The results provided evidence that additional research is worth pursuing and that effective and inexpensive online materials are achievable.

3:45-4:00 pm : Closing  Session

 

 

Contact Info

Center for
Learning & Innovation 
765-677-1821
Email

twitter facebook

CONFERENCE SPONSORS

Cengage Learning

McGraw-Hill

Pearson

Mendeley